Tag Archives: Eden

The doves from above

Yesterday our Collared Dove left her nest so Phil took a quick snap with his phone…

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Our first new babies! Here’s hoping the Jackdaws don’t spot them.

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Beneath the tree to the left is a group of large boulders of volcanic ash deposited by glaciers at the end of the last ice age. It stands between Great Langdale Beck and the road that leads west to the axe factory at the Pike of Stickle, amongst the Langdale Pikes seen in the distance. On the eastern face of the rock are a complex series of carvings that consist of several groups of concentric rings with some linear grooves and groups of micro-cups.

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What is amazing is that despite the fact that the boulder is popular with climbers and the whole area popular with walkers and holiday makers these late Neolithic or Bronze Age carvings were not recognised as such until as recently as 1999.

(Gavin Parry 2003)
It is thought that this site was linked in some way with the nearby axe factory; the Langdale Beck valley would have made an easy route eastwards for the transportation of the axe blanks and it could even be the case that the carvings represent a stylised map of the peaks and features of the area.

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Stonecircles.org

Phil’s painting of the boulder is currently on display until 6th September at the     Lake Artists summer exhibition, at The New Hall, Grasmere.


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Metal leaf, coloured ink and beeswax on watercolour paper.

Pot luck!

We were sorting through our tree pots on Sunday in preparation for next Saturday’s NGS open garden event and were about to move the trestle …..


Phil spotted her just in time …


We should have some new blackbird chicks very soon!

Prior to discovery, we had been watering with the hose so she’s had a daily drenching and still she remained. Phil has already named the chicks (answers on a postcard please) but there will be no Rush to return your entries!

Who killed the Black Dahlia?

The Dahlias in the raised bed proved to be quite a talking point with passers by over the fence. It is the first time we have grown them and they provided a fabulous shock of burgundy and red right through into the first frost of November.


There one moment and gone in a flash, succumbed to the deadly  hand of Jack Frost.

Summing up!

I recently had the pleasure of working at ‘Our Lady and St Wilfrid’s Church’ Warwick bridge Carlisle.

It is the only church in Cumbria  designed by Augustus Pugin. The building was completed in 1841 with a construction cost of £2,586. The church is currently undergoing major renovations with the aid of a National Lottery grant in the order of £240.000.

During a brief delay in the re-Installation of two stained glass panels (the stonemason making some sizing adjustment to the new sandstone cill), I took the opportunity to take a couple of snaps of the interior with my phone.

The Palace of Westminster was designed by Charles Barry and Augustus Pugin. Building work began in 1840 originally estimated to take six years and cost £700.000 it was formally opened in 1852. The building work wasn’t  finished until 1870 when the clock tower housing the bell ‘Big Ben’ was finally completed. The construction cost was closer to £2000,000.

Recent proposals for much needed renovation work to The Palace of Westminster have suggested a 32 year rolling program of work with an estimate of £5.7 bn. If the work was to run over 40 years the cost would rise to £7.1 bn.