Tag Archives: Armathwaite

A trio of gardens in Armathwaite

We’re opening our garden at The Faulds in conjunction with Hazel Cottage and Coombe Eden on 2nd and 3rd June For the National Garden Scheme, which supports healthcare charities.

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Combined admission is £5 per adult and children free. Home made cakes and teas are available at Hazel cottage and we have plants for sale. Some of Phil’s fantastic art work will also be on display. We’d love to see you!

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Remembrance 100 exhibition

ORG_DSC06986Great news! Both of Phil’s works have been accepted and will be two of the 100 selected artworks to be showcased in the Remembrance 100 exhibition at Carlisle Castle. The exhibition starts on 21st May and ends 2nd September.

‘Hope and Glory ‘ is a thought provoking painting and here is the narrative Phil submitted with his work:

‘Swifts screeching overhead herald the arrival of summer, returning each year to a landscape shaped by our ancestors. The country church nestled amid prehistoric earth works and medieval field patterns.

My childhood free from the traumas of war, minor cuts and bruises cured with a mother’s kiss, Germolene and sticking plaster.

Echoes of The Battle of Britain above the Kent coast, remind us of the sacrifice of others, who made this possible.

Many less fortunate, fleeing the horrors of their war-torn homelands look out across the English Channel, wondering whether this green and pleasant land will offer them sanctuary too.’

Part of the iconic ceramic poppy installation ‘Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red’  by artist Paul Cummins and designer Tom Piper which honours Britains war heroes who died 100 years ago is also heading to Carlisle Castle. It was first seen at the Tower of London and the original commission consisted of 888,246 poppies – one to commemorate every British or Colonial life lost at the front during the First World War.

The two sculptures ‘Weeping Window’ and ‘Wave’ containing 11,000 of the poppies are touring the UK. ‘Weeping Window’ will cascade from the top of the castle keep for 6 weeks from 23rd May until 8th July.

 

Lest we forget….

This week Phil submitted work to be considered for the Remembrance 100 – Open Art Exhibition, which is being hosted at Carlisle Castle, 21st May – 2nd Sept 2018.

2018 marks 100 years since the end of the First World War and this Heritage Lottery Funded exhibition will consist of 100 selected artworks which have been made as a creative response to the theme of ‘Remembrance’. 2018 is the centenary of end of the First World War and the start of Remembrance as we know it today.

The brief was to consider the impact of Remembrance and to reflect on the question ‘What does Remembrance mean to me?’

During the First World War, Phil’s Grandfather had served in the Royal Navy as a Stoker 1st Class, aboard the Iron Duke Super Dreadnought-class ship HMS Marlborough.

At 18.17 on 31st May 1916, HMS Marlborough fired the opening salvos in the naval engagement with the German High Seas Fleet at Jutland. At 18.39 the Marlborough was struck by a torpedo fired by the German Cruiser Wiesbaden, tearing a 28 foot hole in the hull, about 20 feet below the waterline. The Marlborough continued in the battle at reduced speed and was eventually escorted by HMS Fearless to the Humber for temporary repairs.

Two of the crew of the Marlborough were killed during the course of the action;

Edgar George Monk – Stoker 1st Class

William Rustage – Stoker 1st Class

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Jutland. ‘Our children shall understand when our fate was changed and by whose hand.’ The Verdicts by Rudyard Kipling

Phil painted this picture in the 1990’s having been inspired by an oil painting of the Marlborough by his Uncle Norman. After he died, Phil was offered his oil paints, brushes and easels and when he went to collect them, saw for the first time a detailed pencil drawing of the Marlborough by his Grandfather who had served on her. The drawing was completed at Devonport Dock and is dated 1914.

Stars of last week’s show

Only one week until our next NGS open garden event.

Our visitors last week were particularly interested in two of our unusual specimens;

Sinocalycalycanthus ‘Hartlage Wine’

Dwarf Horse Chestnut, Aesculus Pavia ‘Koehnei’

And not forgetting Shackleton.

Here’s hoping for better weather!

Rain didn’t stop play

Saturday we opened the garden in support of the National Gardens Scheme.

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The day had a promising start with bright sunshine and not a cloud in the sky but the humidity heralded the torrential rain and thunder storm that was to hit mid-afternoon.

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5070d7f8-de42-48de-8e08-f0e1fafb81e5Some came armed with umbrellas and rain coats and some with nothing but a positive attitude and much laughter as they resigned themselves to getting absolutely soaked through!


Huge thanks to The Pot Place for loaning five ’emergency’ hanging baskets. We had ordered some self watering ‘cup and saucer’ ones which have an inbuilt reservoir and only require watering twice a week,  but they didn’t arrive and the courtyard wouldn’t have looked as good without the lovely flowers.

Thanks go to Phil’s Mum  who helped with last minute weeding, tidying and ticket sales and his Dad who counted legs, divided by two and kept the visitors entertained in the garden.

cd2f57da-8d0f-4451-88cb-76ce86d20bbcThanks also to our lovely friends who paid to come in although they have seen the garden many times before.

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We turned the summerhouse into a pop-up gallery to display some of Phil’s work.

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And we get to do it all again for NGS on Sunday 11th June 12-5pm … hope to see you then!

Pot luck!

We were sorting through our tree pots on Sunday in preparation for next Saturday’s NGS open garden event and were about to move the trestle …..


Phil spotted her just in time …


We should have some new blackbird chicks very soon!

Prior to discovery, we had been watering with the hose so she’s had a daily drenching and still she remained. Phil has already named the chicks (answers on a postcard please) but there will be no Rush to return your entries!

National Gardens Scheme: a potted history

Next Saturday 27 May we are opening our garden, in support of the National Garden Scheme.

Beneficiary charities are: The Queen’s Nursing Institute, Macmillan Cancer Support, Marie Curie, Carers Trust, Hospice UK, Perennial, Parkinson’s UK and other guest charities.
Around 3,700 gardens open each year for the National Garden Scheme, all of the gardens can be found on NGS website or in their Garden Visitor’s Handbook, published annually.
The National Garden Scheme has a rich and interesting history that is closely connected with nursing in the UK, which has  been my occupation for the last 31 years.

In 1859, William Rathbone, a Liverpool merchant, employed a nurse to care for his wife at home. After his wife’s death, Rathbone kept the nurse on to help poor people in the neighbourhood. Later, Rathbone raised funds for the recruitment, training and employment of nurses to go into the deprived areas of the city.

In 1926 the organisation decided to raise a special fund in memory of their patron, Queen Alexandra, who had recently died. The fund would pay for training and would also support nurses who were retiring. A council member, Miss Elsie Wagg, came up with the idea of raising money for charity through the nation’s obsession with gardening, by asking people to open their gardens to visitors and charging a modest entry fee that would be donated.

In 1927 The National Garden Scheme was founded. Individuals were asked to open up their gardens for ‘a shilling a head’. In the first year 609 gardens raised over £8,000. A year later, the district nursing organisation became officially named the Queen’s Nursing Institute.

By 1931 a network of volunteer County Organisers had been set up and over 1,000 private gardens were open.

In 1932, Country Life magazine published an illustrated guide – costing one shilling – to 1,079 gardens open for charity, with a green cover and an introduction by its editor, Christopher Hussey.

In 1948, after the Second World War, the National Health Service took on the District Nursing Service, but money was still needed to care for retired nurses and invest in training. The National Garden Scheme offered to donate funding to the National Trust to restore and preserve important gardens. In return, the National Trust opened many of its most prestigious gardens for the National Garden Scheme.

In  1970 1,234 gardens opened raising almost £52,000.

In 1984 Macmillan Cancer Support joined the list of beneficiary charities.

In 1996 Marie Curie (formerly Marie Curie Cancer Care), Help the Hospices and Crossroads (now Carers Trust) also became beneficiary charities.

In  2013 Parkinson’s UK joined as a ‘guest charity’ of the National Garden Scheme, they went on to become a permanent beneficiary.

In 2016 in honour of Frogmore gardens opening for 70 years for the National Garden Scheme, 70 Queen’s Nurses attended the open day in June.

NGS donations for 2017:  MacMillan £500,000. Marie Curie £500,000. Hospice UK £500,000. Carers Trust £400,000. Qni  £375,000.


It would be lovely to see you next weekend. We have plants for sale and Phil is even parting with some trees!!!

2 The Faulds CA49PB. Featured in Cumbria Life, a compact garden accessed via sandstone steps is divided into 3 distinct areas. Rare and unusual trees, shrubs and herbaceous perennials, a collection of trees in pots grown from seed, raised beds, wild- life pond and Bantam run. Art work and stained glass are on display. Nearby church with stained glass by Burne-Jones/William Morris and recent window by the garden owner.
For refreshments there are 2 PHs and a village shop all within a short walking distance.